Deadliest Catch and Fortrus

We made it past Dutch but we didn’t end up making it all the way to Juneau. We pulled into Kodiak, Alaska and are waiting for the weather to break in the gulf before we cross.

Crew of the m/y Fortrus on the Cornelia Marie. Photo by Natasha Kovalenko.

Fortrus pulled into the second largest fishing harbor in America. We docked beside the Cornelia Marie from the Deadliest Catch. The Time Bandit is out of the water with the hopes of being splashed next week. Fortrus and the rest of the crews ended up meeting out one night. Tony Lara, the captain of the Cornelia Marie has been a huge help. Paul and the crew invited Tony on board for dinner and he returned the favor by having us and bunch of fisherman over to his place for a seafood BBQ.  We had a great time and everybody here in Kodiak have been awesome.

On deck with Captain Tony aboard the m/v Cornelia Marie. Photo by Natasha Kovalenko.

Tony gave us all a great tour of the Cornelia. It’s an amazing fishing machine.

Captain Tony Lara of the m/v Cornelia Marie giving some fishing pointers.

Hanging in the mess of the m/v Cornelia Marie.

We’ve seen sea otters, whales and we’ve been getting way too close to some sea lions.

Swimming sea lion. Photo by Natasha Kovalenko

Sea otter. Photo by Natasha Kovalenko.

Fortrus has had a great time in Kodiak and will be bummed to leave the island life.

Sea lion. Photo by Michael Power.

Fortrus with the fleet in Kodiak. Photo by Paul McDonald.

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Cambridge Bay

Due to some weather, we decided to stay in Cambridge Bay for a few extra days. Levi and Charlie took the guests fishing up a fresh watercreek. They pulled in some good fish and had a great time.  They met a retired local named Jimmy and made arrangements to meet up with him the next day.

Quads alongside Fortrus. Photo by Stephen McDonald.

Photo by Stephen McDonald.

Jimmy came by the boat and took us to meet his sister and brother in-law who rented us some quads and a truck. We followed Jimmy up to Mount Pelee. The weather was fantastic and the ride was super fun. A few of us ran up the mountain and Jacob spotted a small herd of Muskox.  Steve got some amazing video of the herd running strait down at him.  We were lucky enough to get some great pictures right up close to these wild creatures. Amazing… On the way back we found a weasel and also pulled in some Arctic Char with Jimmy.

Muskox. Photo by Michael Power.

Photo by Michael Power.

The people of Cambridge Bay have been very helpful and Fortrus is now fully provisioned for the next leg of it’s journey. We tried to fuel while we were here but due to ice the town’s delivery of winter fuel is late and they can’t afford to deplete their supplies any more.

Weasel. Photo by Michael Power.

We all had a very memorable time in Cambridge Bay….

Next Stop, Tuktoyaktuk.

Trick photography!  Photo by Michael Power.


Search for the Narwhal

After we left Pond Inlet we went on a search for the infamous Narwhal. The crew has put a lot of research into finding them. All sources pointed us to a place called Bruce’s Head in Koluktoo Bay.  We anchored there for the night in the hopes of seeing the unicorn of the sea. After no sightings, we decided to head out on the morning of the 27th.

Approaching the Glacier. Photo by Michael Powers.

We had to do a little more exploring and decided to head up into Croker Bay to see some Glaciers. As we approached the first glacier werealized that there was a lot of ice floating around in the fjord.As Fortrus crept towards the Ice wall, Paul spotted a polar bear swimming in the water. We quickly turned the boat around and followed her as she swam towards an Iceberg. The cameras were flying on the bow as she climbed up the Iceberg and disappeared down the other side.

Polar Bear! Photo by Paul McDonald

Steve spotted her again as she swam towards the glacier. Charlie brought the little boat around and we began to hunt her down for some closer photos. The ice was thick and the scout was banging through some very big bergs. The current was ripping and the ice tried to grab us a few times. Ice flows are definitely not something to play with.

Ice. Photo by Stephen McDonald.

Scott and Charlie Scouting the bear through the ice. Photo by Michael Power

The tender caught up to the bear and we took some great photos of her with some magnificent backdrops. In the moment and not reallythinking, we noticed that we were under at least ten stories of ice that could fall on us at any moment. Very dangerous and extremely scary but the end result was, getting some Ridiculous photos and video.

More then ten stories tall at the water. Photo taken by Stephen McDonald.

We have no idea what’s next.

The Boys just after we spotted the polar bear. Photo by Natasha Kovalenko


The trip across the northern Labrador Sea couldn’t have gone any smoother. The smiles and excitement from seeing a polar bear lasted the two days of the crossing.

Crossing the Labrador Sea. Photo by Natasha Kovalenko

The fog lifted as we arrived into the Pond Inlet channel and the day became absolutely beautiful and sunny. Fortrus was surrounded by mountains covered in glaciers as she cruised into Pond Inlet.

Fog over the montains: Photo by Erik Aubry

Fog lifting. Photo by Erik Aubry

Entering Pond Inlet. Photo by Natasha Kovalenko

We cleared into Canadian customs and had a little walkaround town. We got to see our first Narwhal tooth. Unbelievable to imagine how big these animals must be.

Village of Pond Inlet. Population 1,315. Photo by Melanie Waugh

Fortrus will make her way west through some small icebergs tonight where she will anchor off Bruce Head in the attempt to find the illusive Narwhal. This spot hosts many different species of sea mammals. We will spend the day here, do a little fishing and maybe go ashore for a hike up a mountain.


Upernavik

The Icebergs got bigger and bigger as Fortrus cruised north along the west coast of Greenland. The scenery as we pulled into Upernavik was absolutely stunning.

Town of Upernavik. Photo by Michael Power

We had a good last night in Upernavik that included a massive fireworks show that I’m sure the locals will be talking about for years.

The guests and crew went through a few hundred rounds of paintballs and most are feeling the affects today. The night also included a skinny dip by a few brave souls.

Midnight Sun. Photo by Michael Power

We met Trevor, a fellow Australian that has been traveling around the world for years on his 30ft sloop. He spends his winters locked in the Greenlandic Ice with 5 months of provisions. We had him onboard for breakfast and sent an email off to his wife saying that he was O.K. They hadn’t been in contact with each other for months.

Trevor’s Sloop. Photo by Michael Power

Amanzi Marine organized us some fuel in Upernavik. We topped up and took off. Greenland is now behind us. Wow… it is absolutely stunning.

Fueling. Photo by Michael Power

Next stop is Pond Inlet, Canada.


NYC in our sights

An early morning departure from Atlantic City didn’t fair too well with some of our guests onboard. We had a few men down due to a big night followed by early start and small seas. We can definitely blame this one on the alcohol.

We pulled into New York City around two o’clock in the afternoon. A little hazy but,  all the guests and crew were on deck as we passed by the statue and viewed the new freedom tower for the first time.

Image courtesy of Elisha Williams

We docked at North Cove, located right in the heart of the financial district and in the shadow of the new tower. A perfect place to be in New York.

Next stop will be Newport.


Light show on the way to Atlantic City, NJ

Atlantic city was the next stop on our journey. To get there we needed to cruise through the C & D canal at night. The weather was beautiful and the lights along the canal were impressive.

Photo courtesy of Erik Aubry

Next stop New York City!